A private company announced plans this week to build a coal-to-liquid fuel plant in western Kentucky, which could also lead to additional facilities.

Officials with US Fuel Corporation say their plant will convert coal to “non-petroleum based alternative fuels” like diesel and aviation fuel, and can process 148 tons of coal per day to produce 8,500 gallons of high grade, low sulfur diesel.

The first facility will be built in Capital City, Muhlenberg County, in the Western Coalfields, according to information on the company’s website posted on Tuesday, and will lead to other “larger scaled commercial facilities.”

The company plans to build the additional sites where coal is readily available, though any future plans as to specific locations haven’t been released. The company does note that their plants are based on proven scalable technology and will be environmentally friendly.

“As planned, the US Fuel facilities will meet federal state and local emissions standards; they will produce a near zero discharge of both carbon dioxide and wastewater,” the company’s statement reads.

The company also claims that engines using this type of fuel are “significantly cleaner” and produce fewer emissions of air pollutants such as carbon dioxides and sulfur oxides than typical internal combustion engines utilizing petroleum based fuels.

Rep. Brent Yonts, D-Greenville, said Muhlenberg County is an excellent choice for US Fuel Corporation’s first facility because of the local coal supply and the area’s interest in clean coal alternatives. “This plant will utilize clean coal technology to provide jobs and hope to our local coal miners and give direction to the rest of the country about other ways coal can be used to provide energy to our nation.”

Read more: Hazard Herald (KY) – Plans announced for coal to fuel plant in Ky

 

Direct Quotes:

Officials from US Fuel Corporation have said “Their plant can convert into non-petroleum based alternative fuels like diesel and aviation fuel, and can process 148 tons of coal per day to produce 8,500 gallons of high grade, low sulfur diesel” (Hazard-Herald Staff, 2012, p. 1)

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